tisdag, mars 22, 2011

Japan, the world and the nuclear power

(Photo taken from: http://www.nytimes.com/2011/03/17/world/asia/17nuclear.html?_r=1&partner=rss&emc=rss)

This is Fukushima in Japan and as we all know, the consequences of this terrible accident are yet to be seen.

As always when there are problems with our nuclear plants - whether it's in Japan, France, Sweden, the USA or elsewhere - the aim of the work carried out by the representatives of the different authorities and governments, is to 'calm' the population.

Most of us understand that the problems with the nuclear power and its use all over the world, are greater than the authorities will let us know. How do we know this?
Historically all incidents or deliberate use of nuclear power, for civilian as well as military use, have been surrounded by mistakes and false information.
This goes for the tests made in connection with the Manhattan Project and Robert Oppenheimers role in that destructive work as well as for the three great incidents I've illustrated in this blog, namely Three Mile Island (1979), Chernobyl/Tjernobyl (1986) and now Fukushima (2011).

We have to remember that the nuclear power is the most toxic energy source man has ever invented and that the problems both in extracting uranium all over the world, erecting and running nuclear plants have lead to great and permanent destruction of many areas in the world.

Another factor that increases the risks for 'misinformation' is of course the fact that behind this industry there are billions and billions of dollars, euros invested, making some people very rich - not least decision makers - and others poor and deadly sick.

Unfortunately most people - when there are no reports of incidents or accidents in connection to the nuclear power - react as the man who falls out of a window from a skyscraper: So far nothing has happened.

Not least a couple of years after an accident like this when people in countries not directly affected by the accident see their everyday life continue as before the accident, they tend to forget and believe that everything is alright, not thinking of those being killed and injured for life and not knowing the long term effects for the earth as a whole.

Man might be intelligent but it's not 'traditionally' intelligent people we first of all need, it's intellectuals, reflecting more deeply on issues of importance for the survival of all living creatures on this earth, without being bound by the consumer society-dogma.
Intelligence is measured along extremely narrow parameters, related to a natural scientific perspective and those people are seldom intellectuals but very often they possess an almost fanatic attachment to an overall scientific paradigm, making them very rigid and fundamentalistic in their thinking and outlooks.

I hope that the leaders in some countries in the world will start to reevaluate the use of nuclear power as the main source of energy in the modern society, as this is not the last accident we will witness and probably not the worst either.

People being in favour of nuclear power are so because of economical reasons, and thereby they also neglect all the suffering and problems the nuclear power has caused humanity and we can only mention Hiroshima and Nagasaki as two very obvious examples.

President Sarkozy has declared that France will not leave the nuclear power as the main resource for energy extraction in order to sustain not least the industry and its very energy consuming processes. One have to remember though that Sarkozy in fact is a lobbyist for nuclear power as he, before becoming the president of France, held a position within the nuclear industry and its lobbying organisations.

Look at these pictures and put yourself in the position of those affected by these catastrophies and if you still think that those 'sacrifices' are negligible in comparison to the positive sides of nuclear power, then you are more cynic than the most cynic!

Three Mile Island
(Photo taken from: http://www.mnn.com/sites/default/files/main_dykstra_0324.jpg)

Tjernobyl
(Photo taken from: http://pripyat.com/sm/site/news/uploads/2007/04/12/1641_1.jpg)

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